ATLA > Member Center > Annual Conference > Past Conferences > 2013 Annual Conference > Conference Schedule > Center for the Study of Information and Religion (CSIR) Sessions

Center for the Study of Information and Religion (CSIR) Sessions

 

 

 
  
  
  
  
Thursday, Jun 20, 201310:30AM-11:30AMMy Talk Today: LDS Sacrament Meeting Talks and the Transfer of Knowledge and CultureCSIR Paper
Patricia Katopol, School of Library and Information Science, University of Iowa
In churches across the United States, Sunday morning brings a prepared sermon given by ordained officiators trained by the seminaries, divinity schools or Bible colleges of their denomination. In a chapel of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon), however, instead of a sermon, congregants will hear several talks given by laypersons ranging in age from schoolchildren to grandparents. The proposed paper will explore the role of Sacrament Meeting talks in the transmission of religious knowledge and adherent culture to LDS congregations, using Berger and Luckmann’s (1966) theories regarding the Social Construction of Reality and aspects of Martins (2002) work on organizational culture.
Location: Morehead
Thursday, Jun 20, 201301:00PM-02:00PM“My Greatest Help Comes from the Lord”: Religion and the Information Behaviors of Dementia CaregiversCSIR Paper
Michelle Kazmer and Robert L. Glueckauf, Florida State University
How do religious beliefs, practices and communities affect how caregivers of loved ones with dementia approach information seeking, information use and information evaluation with respect to their caregiving activities? This paper is based on qualitative data collected via 81 interviews with dementia caregivers and counselors who were involved in two research projects designed primarily to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy problem-solving interventions in improving depression and reducing stress among dementia caregivers. These findings have implications for the further study of health information and the influence of religion on its use among caregivers, an area so far under-researched in health information behavior.
Location: Davidson
Thursday, Jun 20, 201302:00PM-03:30PMMedia Information Sources and the Israeli Rabbi / Taqwacore Online: A Punk Construction of Religious Knowledge on the InternetCSIR Paper
Yoel Cohen, Ariel University Center, Israel, and Meghan Dougharty, Loyola University, Chicago
“Media Information Sources and the Israeli Rabbi” examines the information-gathering practices of Israeli rabbis, and the impact of information sources upon the rabbis. Rabbis use news media sources to gather information about general national and world affairs and about developments inside their religious communities. Synagogue rabbis require in their pastoral work to know about what their own congregants are exposed to in media terms. This is also true with rabbi-religious teachers in religious high schools and yeshivot (colleges of higher religious study). Also, rabbinical court judges in Israel require not only a mastery of Jewish religious law (halakhah) but also an awareness of contemporary affairs. To produce a picture of rabbis’ information sources, the author completed a survey of Israeli rabbis and mass media, the results of which will be presented here.  The subject of “Taqwacore Online: A Punk Construction of Religious Knowledge on the Internet” is a much-photocopied, unpublished novel by Michael Muhammad Knight that was passed around by young Muslims across U.S. when it came out in 2003. The Taqwacores told the story of a group of young people sharing a house in Buffalo, N.Y., as they came of age, rebelled, questioned their faith and tested the limits of their religious and political beliefs. The characters include a straight-edge Sunni Muslim, a burqa-wearing riotgrrl, a Sufi punk and straight-laced Islamic engineering student questioning his identity. The novel spawned a vibrant youth subculture that continues to exist in online social spaces and is slowly developing authentic sets of meanings and practices despite popular scrutiny.
Location: Park
Thursday, Jun 20, 201303:30PM-04:30PMA Model for Multicultural Leadership: An Ideological Texture Analysis of Acts 8:26-40CSIR Poster Session
Jane Caulton, Regent University School of Global Leadership and Entrepreneurship
As leaders become more globally engaged, they find themselves with subordinates from different backgrounds, races, ethnicities, and cultures. An examination of the ideological texture of Acts 8:26-40 may provide insight to meeting the challenges that differences sometime bring. The story of the encounter between a Christian evangelist and a Jewish Ethiopian demonstrates that people can work together and achieve successful outcomes. Considerations of the ideological sub-textures individual location, relation to groups, modes of intellectual discourse and spheres of ideology in examining the text reveal the power of spirituality, humility and compassion in conquering boundaries of separation. These elements fuel the theory and practice of multicultural leadership.
Location: Grand CD
Thursday, Jun 20, 201303:30PM-04:30PMA Proposal for a Topical Classification of Hymns Based on Emotion and FeelingCSIR Poster Session
Denise Bedford, Kent State University
Hymns are most commonly performed or sung in association with formal religious services, but they also reflect rich emotions that are part of everyday spiritual life for many Christians. Knowledge of and access to hymns appears to be highly dependent upon firsthand knowledge. How can we learn new hymns or hymns from other denominations? What sources and forms of access are available? There are two primary sources for discovering hymns, and within those sources are several basic ways that hymns may be classified. This research focuses on developing a distinct classification scheme of topics related to emotions and feelings addressed in Christian hymns, taking Plutchik’s three-dimensional circumplex model as its framework.
Location: Grand CD
Thursday, Jun 20, 201304:30PM-05:30PMA Theory of DIKW Applied to Religious KnowledgeCSIR Paper
Terry Robertson, Andrews University
DIKW is a conventional construct for defining information. While reasonably explanatory in the hard and social sciences, it becomes unclear in humanities textual scholarship. Defining “data” in religious knowledge is particularly difficult within this construct. This study seeks to determine whether there is a functional place for DIKW in text-based religious discourse, or if the concept should be invalidated completely.
Location: Morehead
Thursday, Jun 20, 201304:30PM-05:30PMWhence God? The Origin of Ultimate ConcernCSIR Paper
Jonathan Doner, Independent Scholar
Several recent works have addressed the issue of the origin, or “phylogeny,” of religion. Some have linked this occurrence to evolutionary mechanisms, others to sociological processes, and still others to psychological functions. Each position has interest and sheds a different light on a necessarily complex process. The paper examines several of these theories and offers a synthetic perspective which integrates psychological, sociological, evolutionary and theological concepts in a new manner. The proposed perspective is based on a new understanding of symbolic consciousness, the perception of intentionality, the nature of faith and the construction of self.
Location: Davidson
Friday, Jun 21, 201310:30AM-12:00PMKeeping Faith: Factors Contributing to Spiritual Transformation, Identity, and Maturity in Adolescents / The Family in the Digital Age: How, Surprisingly, the Family is growing as the primary source of religious knowledge in youthCSIR Paper
Glory Emmanuel and Harold D. Delaney, University of New Mexico, and Mark Robertson, Old Orchard Church
Adolescence and early adulthood are certainly the most religiously unstable phases of the life course. Despite its instability, religiosity and spirituality (RS) demonstrate clinical utility: they have been found to be protective factors for adolescents against alcohol abuse, depression, and risky behaviors, such as unsafe sexual practices. “Keeping Faith: Factors Contributing to Spiritual Transformation, Identity, and Maturity in Adolescents” investigated spiritual development among church-attending adolescents to understand how religious social support (family, friends, church, mentorship) and personal devotional activities (prayer, worship, study of sacred texts) were related to spiritual transformation (ST), spiritual identity and spiritual maturity. These findings may enable mental health professionals, religious leaders, and parental units to better understand how to support adolescents with RS interest in their journey of spiritual development.  In this new era of digital accessibility and connectivity, research shows that the family is actually the place where youth are gaining their foundational religious knowledge; that more than ever, young people are emulating the faith of their parents. “The Family in the Digital Age: How, Surprisingly, the Family Is Growing as the Primary Source of Religious Knowledge in Youth” focuses on research showing how religious parents have a great opportunity to model their faith to their children, knowing that the impact is great. At the same time, the study shows young people’s ability to analyze arguments has been diminished as they accept propositions based on family histories and contexts as opposed to weighing arguments with discernment. Educators and clergy should challenge them to engage in more critical thinking.
Location: Park
Friday, Jun 21, 201301:30PM-03:00PMTeaching and Learning in the Archives: Partnering for Undergraduate Formation in Service and ResearchCSIR Paper
Carisse Berryhill and Tracy Shilcutt, Abilene Christian University
 
“Teaching and Learning in the Archives: Partnering for Undergraduate Formation in Service and Researc” describes an iterative series of collaborations between a history professor and a special collections librarian to develop pedagogical innovations to foster intellectual and spiritual formation of undergraduate students at a Christian university. We expect that this immersive experience in primary sources, many of which are related to the religious heritage of the university and its students, will have long range benefits in perception of the value of primary sources, in support for preservation and research in archives, and in career choices toward archives or museum science. By exposure to the documented history of the university's religious and intellectual efforts, students will be able to form an intellectual and spiritual synthesis of the context of their education at ACU. Arguably, the greatest obstacle facing a religious studies education within academia is ecumenism. Most scholars find the world’s major religions to be mutually exclusive; apparent differences, they conclude, are too disparate for reconciliation, despite common themes of virtue and a Divine Reality. This attitude towards ecumenism inevitably trickles down into education. Consequently, pedagogy is usually historical or anthropological in character.
Location: Independence
Friday, Jun 21, 201303:30PM-04:30PMA Study on the Effects of Iranian Religions on Its House ArchitectureCSIR Paper
Khosro Movahed, Shiraz Islamic Azad University
This article will explain the effects of Iranian religions (Zoroastrian and Islam) on its house architecture. It will analyze the Iranian houses in the past and will show how the Iranian architecture was in harmony with Iranian religion, as well as its ideology. Then it will be demonstrated in details how its new planning solutions have failed to continue the thoughts of the past. To better understand the role and relations of architecture and identity, this paper attempts to discover the changing of Iranian house architecture through the last century. The results provide an effective strategy for future planning of Iranian city.
Location: Morehead
Friday, Jun 21, 201303:30PM-04:30PMAn Analysis of Social Phenomena in the View of Ijtihadic Paradigm of Religious ScienceCSIR Paper
Mahdi Alipour and Hamid Reza Hassani, Research Institute of Hawzah and University, Iran
Interpretivism and Critical Social Science, and proposes a different approach to this problem from the perspective of the Ijtihadic Paradigm of Religious Science (IPRS), a new paradigm based on Islamic religion.
Location: Tryon North
Friday, Jun 21, 201303:30PM-04:30PMSaving America: Religion and the Watergate AffairCSIR Paper
David Settje, Concordia University Chicago
This paper is part of a study of religious reactions to Watergate during Richard M. Nixon’s administration. While numerous investigations examine the political, media, and judicial aspects of Watergate, too few historians have delved into popular reactions, including religious sentiments in the context of this crisis. Yet abundant material demonstrates how religious leaders, denominations, and lay people dialogued about Watergate through their religious lens. Understanding how religious institutions communicated about the Watergate crisis will assist in better comprehending how information and religion have intersected throughout history. This paper gives a snapshot into how this occurred in the 1970s and will better illustrate how that translated into people's understanding of a contentious issue through a religious lens.
Location: Davidson
Friday, Jun 21, 201304:30PM-05:30PMInformation Structures in the Christian Reference BibleCSIR Paper
John Walsh and Allison M. McCormack, Indiana University
This project examines the modern reference Bible from the perspective of documentation studies, exploring the various information structures found in such documents and the concept of “indexicality” in the context of sacred documents. This study will perform document analysis of a variety of reference editions of the Bible; survey the information structures found in these documents; describe the indexical characteristics that are expressed by these information structures; suggest possible theological implications and motivations of these structures; and consider ways in which these seemingly traditional documentary features serve as models and types for structures, strategies, and functionality found in contemporary digital information and document environments.
Location: Park
Friday, Jun 21, 201304:30PM-05:30PMModeling and Representing Religion Language to Support Audio Transcription of Christian SermonsCSIR Paper
Denise Bedford and David Steinberg, Kent State University
A rich store of religious sermons has been recorded as audio files, although a text transcript is more effective for religious study and learning. This presentation describes research related to speech recognition systems and whether quality improvements are possible in large vocabulary contexts, where the domain may be known but language and acoustic patterns are infinite. The goals of this project are (1) to provide good-enough transcripts of the audio files to support accurate automated classification, indexing and summarization (to improve findability of materials); and (2) to automatically produce a transcript that is an 80 percent accurate representation of the audio content. This would support study of sermons not only within the religious community, but also in the humanities, social sciences and knowledge sciences. Transcripts could also improve access for the hearing-impaired.
Location: Tryon North
Friday, June 215:30–6:30pm"Speed-Dating" for ResearchersCSIR Session
Speed-Networking for Researchers.
 
Participants will engage in brief roundtable discussions on various topics related to the intersections of information and religion in order to discover shared research interests.
Location: Brevard
Saturday, Jun 22, 201309:00AM-10:30AMThe Kahal, Zawiya, and Monastic Multiplexes: Informational Centripetalism as Medieval Mission / Religious Attitudes and Attitudes about Scientific Issues: An Analysis of their Social Context in the United StatesCSIR Paper
Larry Poston and Linda Poston, Nyack College, and Robert V. Williams, Patrick Roughen, and Karen Miller, University of South Carolina
The missiological strategies developed in the Middle Ages by the adherents of Judaism, Islam and Christianity were centripetal in approach, drawing persons in each case inward to a central structure. Jews, Muslims and Christians constructed multiplex institutions as outposts for the spread and/or maintenance of their respective beliefs and practices. Included in nearly all of these were collections of religious documents. In “The Kahal, Zawiya, and Monastic Multiplexes: Informational Centripetalism as Medieval Mission”, the origins and histories of these institutions will be explored with particular attention to the role of the document collections in each.  The social contexts of religious knowledge include many different aspects of an individual’s life experiences, education, and theological perspective. “Religious Attitudes and Attitudes about Scientific Issues: An Analysis of their Social Context in the United States” examines the relationships between specific expressed religious views and opinions about specific scientific issues. The scientific issues considered are global climate change, evolution, stem cell research, continental drift age of the earth, the big bang and nanotechnology. The religious attitudes examined include belief in God, feeling “born again,” extent of religious feelings, commitment to religion, Bible reading and whether God punishes people who deserve it.
Location: College
Saturday, Jun 22, 201311:00AM-12:00PMTeaching and Learning in the Archives: Partnering for Undergraduate Formation in Service and Research // The Search for Meaning: Information Seeking and Religious ConversionCSIR Paper
Carisse Berryhill and Tracy Shilcutt, Abilene Christian University; Elysia Guzik, University of Toronto
Teaching and Learning in the Archives” describes an iterative series of collaborations between a history professor and a special collections librarian to develop pedagogical innovations to foster intellectual and spiritual formation of undergraduate students at a Christian university. This immersive experience in primary sources, many of which are related to the religious heritage of the university and its students, will have long range benefits in perception of the value of primary sources, in support for preservation and research in archives, and in career choices toward archives or museum science.  “The Search for Meaning” explores information-seeking practices in the context of religious conversion, that is, the continuous process by which individuals decide to adopt a particular faith community — and its  accompanying rituals and belief systems — as their own. Peer-reviewed articles and conference proceedings in the major library and information science, religious studies, anthropology, and sociology databases will be used to develop a thorough definition of religious conversion and its implications for our understanding of “the social construction of religious knowledge.”
Location: Independence